Strolling Amok

Pops goes on tour.

I’m Adaptable, I Guess

The $8 campsite at Bluewater Lake State Park, New Mexico.

The $8 campsite at Bluewater Lake State Park, New Mexico.

Well, I have to say that come 2016 (assuming some things), I think I’ll be able to make some adjustments from purist boondocking to hitting a pay campsite now and then. There are many campsites here at Bluewater Lake State Park that offer a full range of hookups for $4 additional, each. Ain’t any hookups where I’m parked, the Verizon signal is the strongest I’ve seen for months, and apart from a stout wind the majority of the afternoon – which doesn’t matter much because I’m headed straight into it – it’s mighty, mighty fine here. Oh, yes.

I-40 Eastbound in New Mexico

I-40 Eastbound in New Mexico.

Even the trip over was pleasant. First, there was a 20 MPH tailwind, which pumped mileage up to 15 MPG. The Ford’s cruise control started working again, which I now understand isn’t unusual. I found that there is no fuse for it to blow – it’s merely one of the functions in the Engine Control Module (computer), since the Ford’s throttle is fly-by-wire. It seems that when one of two brake sensors starts to go bad, or the contacts in the related plugs need reseating, they send a signal that the brakes are on. If the ECM thinks the brakes are on, any call for automatic speed control is cancelled. Makes sense. No problems with it today.

The west-most New Mexico Welcome Center on I-40 was nice all by itself.

The west-most New Mexico Welcome Center on I-40 was nice all by itself.

I’ll be staying here for the evening and then hop the short distance to Grants NM tomorrow morning, where I’m planning to stay until the final dash on the 27th. That’ll be more Forest Roads again, so I’ll find out just how Vintage Trailer Unfriendly the area is.

A big sign at the welcome center said this area had many Indian pueblos from 500-1325. Then the Navajos showed up around 1800. Chief Manuelito lived here and was one of the last Indian chiefs to surrender for confinement near Fort Sumner. The Navajos returned here in 1868.

A big sign at the welcome center said this area had many Indian pueblos from 500-1325. Then the Navajos showed up around 1800. Chief Manuelito lived here and was one of the last Indian chiefs to surrender for confinement near Fort Sumner. The Navajos returned here in 1868.

Remember where I was last night? McHood Park? This is what the park itself looks like. Nice.

Remember where I was last night? McHood Park? This is what the park itself looks like. Nice.

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