Strolling Amok

Pops goes on tour.

Ming’s Tufport

The Tufport makes for a handy rig. Photo liberated from Ming's blog.

The Tufport makes for a handy rig. Photo liberated from Ming’s blog.

Reader Ming just got a Tufport truck camper shell, and I thought it’d be worthwhile to send you to her blog, which highlights her recent purchase as well as the pickup bed canopy she was using before. The usual thing to do here is to have a “Guest Post” with pictures, but her blog already has the whole shebang ready to go, and there’s no point in trying to duplicate it here in an attempt make Strolling Amok the end-all, be-all. If it piques your interest, return to it later to see her progress in building it out with the particular features she needs. Nothing like being under the gun with winter approaching in Canada, eh? Enjoy!

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8 thoughts on “Ming’s Tufport

  1. Hey Doug, thanks for the feature on your blog! It looks great, but readers just need to replace all the he’s with she’s and all the ‘his’ with ‘her’ and then it will be accurate! 🙂

    I can see how the ambiguous name and gearhead talk can make that not obvious.

  2. I still can’t believe how expedition ready my truck looks with that camper on. From certain angles it also looks vaguely medical, just needing a red cross logo to look genuine.

    • Since you have an interest in stealth, I’d thought about getting a sign painter to do something like a medical supplies/delivery company name on the door, but you don’t want to hint that things of value might be inside, either. Oh well.

      • hm, maybe yukky stuff like biological samples – BC BioLabs??

        Well I got the lowdown on the window placement, when it came to cutting the holes for them, they determined that a forward placement would weaken the structure too much. They just forgot to tell me at the time, and I can see the logic there.

        I’ve also discovered 3-4 leaks after a series of very wet and windy storms so the camper is going back for some warranty work. Good thing I hadn’t started the build yet.

        • BC Biolabs yup, though if you’re going to stealth in the U.S….

          Interesting on the window location and the leaks, and good timing to get them identified now. I wonder how much of it is simply the mounting holes for the top rack, etc.

          • I think it is the rack mounting holes, there is moisture that I can see on one bolt for sure. The other leaks happened during a huge windstorm, I’m not sure how to replicate that.

            What is OAH? I’m not familiar with that term.

            I’d rather not have to convert the bed every day either, it’s a requirement due to the small size of the rig. We’ll see how that goes. I’m encouraged since coming across the Roadtreking blog, apparently some people do the conversion thing every day and don’t mind.

            But you have to mess with the bedding every time you decamp, right?

            • Remounting the rack with sealer will likely do it, though silicone is not the first choice for endurance in sun exposure. That’s the thing about wind and rain – it can conspire to create puddles where there would normally be none, and it may not replicate until the wind/rain is going in the same direction as before, with a similar ground tilt. Good luck!

              OAH is overall height.

              I think bed conversion means little to those who consider themselves “up for the day”. It’s just a mindset, though one that I lack. If I did not get enough rest the night before for any reason, I’ll take a stab at it during the day, preferably early-mid afternoon. Since I can now dictate my own preferences, it’s allowed.

              In order to pack for travel, I need to move two pillows from the bed to one of the bench seats so that the roof can come all the way down. The blanket(s) stay put, as long as they aren’t bunched up anywhere. That’s it for bedding changes for transport. If I used higher air mattress pressures, I’d need to let some pressure out so that a long roof bar and the front lift panel could lower as far as they need to. Or, the mattress would need to be yanked out of place and laid across the dining table from bench to bench. Those would be more of a nuisance, but not major ones.

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